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Mount Saint Mary College    
 
    
 
  Dec 17, 2017
 
Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Academic Information


Student Responsibilities

Degrees Offered

Registered Degree and Certificate Programs

Requirements for the Baccalaureate Degree

Collaborative Programs

Academic Support

Academic Standards

Enrollment Status

Grading

Honors Standing

Honors Societies

Honors Program

Class Attendance

Registrar Information

Study Abroad

Career Center

Office of Graduate Programs and Adult Degree Completion

Office of Online Education

Student Responsibilities

Basic Rights and Responsibilities

As members of the college community, students shall have certain rights. These rights shall include the freedom to pursue educational goals, the freedom of expression and inquiry, the right to privacy and confidentiality of records, and the right to due process as established in the Student Judicial Code. Students also have certain responsibilities, as members of the college community, both on and off college property, including:

  • The responsibility for respecting and complying with local, state, and federal law;
  • The responsibility for respecting and complying with college rules and regulations;
  • The responsibility for acting in a manner that promotes and atmosphere of learning, free expression, and respect for the rights, dignity, and worth of individuals.

Campus Expression

Discussions and expressions of varied opinions and views are encouraged within the College, subject to requirements for the maintenance of order and provided college operations are not disrupted.

Student Responsibilities and the College Catalog

Students are expected to familiarize themselves with the academic policy and procedures of Mount Saint Mary College through the catalog. They are expected to know degree requirements. If students have questions about policies, procedures, or degree requirements, they are expected to seek assistance from an academic advisor or the appropriate College office.

New York State requires documentation of immunizations (see Health Services under Student Life). Students who fail to comply with these laws will be notified within 15 days of the first day of classes that they will be withdrawn from the College if they do not provide documentation by the deadline stated in the notification. Students who are withdrawn for not submitting this documentation will not be allowed to attend class for the remainder of the semester or session. Current course work will be assigned a Withdrawal (W) grade and the notation “Withdrawal/Immunizations” will be place on the student transcript. Students will not be allowed to register for the next semester or session until these state requirements have been satisfied.

Degrees Offered

Mount Saint Mary College offers courses leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Arts (BA) and Bachelor of Science (BS).

Students may choose from 18 majors: accounting; biology; business management and administration (and within this major three concentrations: finance, marketing, and sports management); chemistry; English; Hispanic studies; history; history/political science; human services; information technology (and within this major two specialties and one concentration: networking and web technologies; and educational technologies); interdisciplinary studies (and within this major four concentrations: liberal studies; general science; technology and digital media, and self-designed); mathematics; media studies (and within this major two concentrations: production and journalism); nursing; psychology; public relations; social science (and within this major four concentrations: history, history/ political science, psychology, and sociology); and sociology (and within this major, a concentration in criminology).

In conjunction with an academic major in a liberal arts and sciences content area, the Division of Education offers courses that will permit students to complete academic requirements for initial New York state certification in the following areas: Childhood Education (1-6); Childhood Education with middle school extension (grades 7-9); dual certification in Childhood Education and special education (grades 1-6) with emphasis on inclusion and pupils with mild disabilities (mild/moderate emotional disturbance, learning disabilities and mental retardation); Adolescent Certification (grades 7-12) ; Adolescence Education with middle school extension (grades 5-6); and Adolescence Education and special education (grades 7-12).

Students interested in obtaining an educational background for careers in environmental studies may select a major in social sciences with electives in the natural sciences; or a major in biology and chemistry with electives in the social sciences.

Time to Degree

Mount Saint Mary College has established specific timeframes within which students are expected to complete program requirements toward their individual degrees. Students are expected to complete all graduation requirements for a degree within six years. Time to complete degree is automatically extended when students are approved for a leave of absence. All other students requesting an extension are required to submit their requests to the Academic Standards Committee.

Registered Degree and Certificate Programs

The following list of academic programs is consistent with the Inventory of Registered Degree and Certificate Programs maintained by the Education Department of the State of New York. Enrollment in other than the following registered programs may jeopardize a student’s eligibility for certain student aid awards.

Programs of study leading to a bachelor of arts degree are available with the following registered programs (HEGIS Codes indicated):

Adolescence Education (7-12)    
  Biology (0401.01)
  Chemistry (1905.01)
  English (1501.01)
  Mathematics (1701.01)
  Social Studies (2201.01)
Adolescence with Special Education (7-12)    
  Biology (0401.01)
  Chemistry (1905.01)
  English (1501.01)
  Mathematics (1701.01)
  Social Studies (2201.01)
Adolescence Education (7-12) with Middle School Extension (5-6)    
  Biology (0401.01)
  Chemistry (1905.01)
  English (1501.01)
  Mathematics (1701.01)
  Social Studies (2201.01)
Biology   (0401)
Chemistry   (1905)
Childhood Education (1-6)   (0802)
Childhood Education with Special Education (1-6)   (0802)
Childhood Education (1-6) with Middle School Extension (7-9)   (0802)
  Biology (0802)
  Chemistry (0802)
  English (0802)
  Mathematics (0802)
  Social Studies (0802)
Communication Arts  
  Public Relations   (0604)
  Media Studies (0605)
    Journalism Concentration    
    Production Concentration    
Criminology   (2209.00)
English   (1501)
Hispanic Studies   (1105)
History   (2205)
History/Political Science   (2299)
Human Services   (2101)
Information Technology (0702)
  Educational Technology Concentration    
  Networking and Web Technologies Concentration    
Interdisciplinary Studies   (4901)
          General Science concentration    
          Liberal Studies concentration  
          Self-designed concentration  
          Technology and Digital Media concentration    
Mathematics   (1701)
Psychology   (2001)
Social Sciences   (2201)
Sociology   (2208)

Programs of study leading to the bachelor of science degree are available with the following registered programs (HEGIS Codes indicated):

Accounting   (0502)

Sports Management concentration  

 

Business Management and Administration  

(0506)

Business Management and Administration/Finance (15 Credits)  

 

Business Management and Administration/Marketing (15 Credits)  

 

Sports Management concentration  

 
Childhood Education (1-6)   (0802)
Childhood Education with special education (1-6)   (0802)
Childhood Education (1-6) with middle school extension (7-9)   (0802)
 

Biology

(0802)
  Chemistry (0802)
  English (0802)
  Mathematics (0802)
  Social Studies (0802)
Information Technology (0701)
  Educational Technology Concentration    
  Networking Concentration    
  Information Technology/Networking or Web Technologies    
Nursing   (1203)

Programs of study leading to certification are available with the following registered programs (HEGIS Codes indicated):

General Accounting   (5002)
Business Management and Administration   (5004)

 

Requirements for the Baccalaureate Degree

1. Minimum Number of Semester Hours

A minimum of 120 semester hours, i.e., the total of the course credits; as in “a minimum of 60 of the 120 semester hours shall be in the liberal arts and sciences.”  Beginning in the Fall 2017 term, the last 12 credits for completing a bachelor’s degree must be taken at Mount Saint Mary College unless approved by the Academic Standards Committee under extenuating circumstances.

2. Liberal Arts and Sciences

Among the 120 semester hours, a minimum of 90 credits shall be in the liberal arts and sciences for a Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree. For the Bachelor of Science (BS) degree, a minimum of 60 of the 120 semester hours shall be in the liberal arts and sciences. For the BS degree through the education curriculum, a minimum of 60-89 of the 120 semester hours shall be in the liberal arts and sciences. For the BS degree for the nursing curriculum, a minimum of 60 of the 120 semester hours shall be in the liberal arts and sciences.

3. Minimum Grade Point Average

A minimum Grade Point Average (GPA) of 2.0 (C grade) is required for the four years of study. Students pursuing New York State teaching certification must achieve a minimum GPA of 2.75.

4. General Education Courses

Completion of 39 credits in general education courses or liberal arts as shown below.

Division of Arts and Letters (12 credits)

  (3) and   (3) are required courses for all students. At least 6 additional credits must be taken in this division. These 12 credits must be distributed over at least two areas in the division: English/communication arts (considered one area); and fine arts (art, music, and theater) or foreign languages. All teacher education students must complete at least 3 credits of a language other than English and all childhood education students must also have at least one course in art, music or theater.

Placement into

  College Writing is determined by the score on the writing section of the SAT/ACT. Students scoring less than 430 on the SAT or less than 18 on ACT will be placed in   (Fundamentals of Writing).   is a credit-bearing course but is not credit toward core.

Division of Natural Sciences and Division of Mathematics and Information Technology (9 credits)

A minimum of one 3- or 4-credit laboratory science is required. Science majors are advised to take

  (4) or   (4). Non-science majors may take either   (3),   (4),   (3),   (4),   (4),   (4),   (3),   (3),    (4)   (4),   (3),   (3),   (3),   (3).

A minimum of one 3- or 4-credit mathematics course is required. Depending on the student’s mathematical proficiency and on the requirements of individual majors, the following courses are appropriate. Science majors are advised to take

  (3) or   (4); non-science majors may elect   or any higher-level course in mathematics. Various examinations are given to identify students’ aptitude for quantitative literacy. If students do not receive a satisfactory score on the placement test to take college-level mathematics course, they will be required to take MTH 0110 and /or   . Both of these courses are 3-credit equivalent developmental courses and are not applicable to the degree.

The remaining 3-credit General Education requirement may be taken in either the Division of Natural Science (astronomy, biology, chemistry, earth science, physics, or science (SCI)) or the Division of Mathematics and Information Technology (the only CSC and CIT courses that count for general education are

  ,   or   ). 

Division of Philosophy and Religious Studies (9 credits)

A minimum of 3 credits in philosophy and a minimum of 3 credits in religious studies are required. The remaining 3 credits may be in either philosophy or religious studies.

Division of Social Sciences (9 credits)

A minimum of one 3-credit course is required in history; any 1000-level course fulfills this requirement. The remaining 6 credits may be taken in the following areas so that within the total social science credits two areas are fulfilled: anthropology, criminology (

  only) economics, geography, history, political science, psychology and sociology.

General Education Curriculum Summary

Division of Arts and Letters

(12 required - 6 must be in English; at least 3 must be in another area)

  •   - College Writing Credits: (3) (required)
  •   - Forms of Literature Credits: (3) (required)
  • ENG or CMA (0-3)
  • ART, MUS, THR, FR, GER, SPA or ITA (3-6)

Division of Natural Science and Division of Mathematics and Information Technology

(9 credits - must include mathematics and a laboratory science)

Division of Social Sciences

(9 credits over two areas; 3 must be in history)

  • HIS (3)
  • ANT, CRI 1110 , ECO, GEO, HIS, POS, PSY, SOC (6) 

Division of Philosophy and Religion

(9 credits - 3 must be in philosophy; 3 must be in religion; remaining can be in either area)

  • PHL (3)
  • REL (3)
  • PHL and/or REL (3)

5. First-Year Experience (FYE) Program

The First-Year Experience (FYE) Program welcomes first-year students and fosters success as they transition into the Mount Saint Mary College community.  Through specifically designed programming throughout students’ first year of college, the FYE cultivates community-based learning, academic success, the personal development necessary for college life, and a connection to the Mount as first-year students become active members in our community of learners.  The First-Year Experience Program includes two components:  (1) Community-Based Learning and (2) FYE 1010.

Community-Based Learning is designed to support first-year students in their academic, social and personal transition to college.  In Community-Based Learning, courses such as BIO 1030, ENG 1010, PSY 1010, or other appropriate courses in the General Education curriculum  or students’ majors are linked to provide students opportunities to make connections between their courses and to receive tailored information literacy instruction.  Each community is composed of 20 students, a personal librarian, an academic coach and two faculty course instructors.  Students entering the traditional program will be required to participate in Community-Based Learning during their first semester of matriculation.  Students entering in the spring semester will be required to enroll in a learning community in the subsequent fall semester and should consult with their academic advisor and the FYE program coordinators to schedule their learning community.  Program requirements for Community-Based Learning and FYE 1010 are outlined on the First-Year Experience (FYE) website (www.msmc.edu/fye).  Successful completion of the First-Year Experience Program is a requirement for graduation.  Exceptions may be made at the discretion of the Vice-President of Academic Affairs (VPAA).

6. Computer Literacy

Demonstration of minimum computer literacy is a requirement for all degree-seeking students. It is recommended that this is completed within the first two years of study for traditional students, and in the first year at the Mount for transfer students.

Computer literacy can be satisfied by:

  • Successful completion of   (Computer Competency)
  • Successful completion of CIT 1002  (Online Computer Competency)
  • Successfully passing the College’s Computer Literacy Test.*
  • Successful completion of   (Investigating Contemporary Issues)
  • Computer Information Technology majors satisfy their computer literacy with   

* Note – the Computer Literacy Test may be taken only once. Students who do not pass this exam must satisfy the computer literacy requirement with one of the courses listed above.

Adolescence Education Candidates: Please Note: New York State, as of February 2011, requires that teacher candidates seeking adolescence certification in teaching students with disabilities, along with adolescence certification in a subject area, must be certified as Adolescence Generalists for Teaching Students with Disabilities in grades 7-12. To be eligible for this certification, all candidates must have completed six hours of study in college level courses in four areas: English, social science, mathematics, and science, in addition to completing all required pedagogical courses. Mount Saint Mary College students will likely complete most of these distributive requirements as part of the required CORE or general education requirements for the bachelor’s degree. However, even if one has met the Mount Saint Mary College general education requirements, these required courses must be met to be eligible to receive New York State certification as an Adolescence Generalist for Teaching Students with Disabilities in grades 7-12.

7. Majors

  1. Bachelor of Arts: A major discipline of studies (“major”) leading to a Bachelor of Arts shall consist of not fewer than 20 and not more than 40 credits in an approved major subject over and above courses in that subject taken to meet general education requirements. Students enrolled in interdisciplinary programs may not exceed 48 credits in the component disciplines taken together over and above the general education requirements or 39 credits in any single component discipline. A minimum of 12 upper-level credits in the major subject (unless otherwise specified by a particular major) must be completed at Mount Saint Mary College. A student who exceeds, or plans to exceed, the 40-credit maximum must initiate a request for waiver (waiver form available in the Office of the Registrar) with an academic advisor. The advisor makes a recommendation and forwards the request to the division chair. The division chair makes a recommendation and forwards the request to the Academic Standards Committee for review and a decision. The committee can approve the overload without additional requirements; disapprove the overload; or require the student to take additional non-major courses equivalent to or less than the overload within the major. Graduation credits would be 120 plus major overload credits not waived.
  2. Bachelor of Science: A major leading to a Bachelor of Science shall consist of not fewer than 20 and not more than 50 credits in an approved major subject over and above courses in that subject taken to meet general education requirements. A minimum of 12 upper-level credits, in the major subject, as specified by the division, must be completed at Mount Saint Mary College.
  3. A major leading to a Bachelor of Science in education for the education curriculum shall consist of not fewer than 20 and not more than 40 credits in an approved major subject over and above courses in that subject taken to meet general education requirements. A minimum of 12 upper-level credits, in the major, as specified by the division, must be completed at Mount Saint Mary College. In addition, the student must have completed 60-89 liberal arts and science credits and have a minimum of 18 credits in approved education courses. For a major to be recorded on the transcript, a student must have a minimum 2.0 Grade Point Average, calculated from all required courses contributing to the major. 
  4. Students may change their academic major with the permission of the chairperson of the department into which they wish to transfer. In order to effect a change of major, students must secure the required signature(s) on a Change/Declare Major form, which then must be submitted to the Office of the Registrar. Students who change their majors understand that, by doing so, the length of time and/or number of total credits required to graduate with that major may increase. Forms are available in the Office of the Registrar and online at: https://my.msmc.edu/web/Registrar/documents-and-forms

8. Minors

A minor area of studies is not required for the baccalaureate degree. However, a student may elect a minor area of studies. A minor area of studies constitutes a group of courses amounting to at least 18 credits in a particular discipline. The following college policy applies to all minors:

  1. At least 9 credits to be used toward a minor must have been taken at Mount Saint Mary College.
  2. A student must have a 2.0 GPA in a discipline for it to be recorded as a minor.
  3. Courses designed as support courses for a major or a maximum of 3 courses (up to 12 credits) required by a major may constitue part of a minor in a second discipline.

Not all academic divisions offer a minor. Students should refer to the information found under each of the Mount’s academic divisions to determine the areas that offer a minor and the guidelines established for the minor. It is advisable that the student consult with a member of the faculty in the area in which the individual wishes to minor when initially planning the program.

9. Concentrations

A concentration is open to all students in all majors. Not all academic divisions offer concentrations.

10. Electives

Completion of a sufficient number of free electives is required to bring the total course work to 120 semester hours. In this category, the student should seek advice and guidance from members of the faculty, but the student is free to select course work provided that free electives shall not be used to increase the work in the major subject beyond the maximum limit set under the major and that not more than 20 elective credits be at the 1000 level. The maximum number of physical education credits that may be credited toward the 120 credits (minimum) for the degree shall be 3 credits.

11. Transfer Students

Students transferring to Mount Saint Mary College with the Associate of Arts (AA) degree or the Associate of Science (AS) degree in a major taught at the College are awarded full junior status and guaranteed 60 credits of transfer. For certain programs, students transferring under community college articulation agreements will be allowed to graduate with up to 45 earned credits in their major, as detailed in the articulation agreements. Students with an Associate of Applied Science (AAS) in business, who enter the business program, are awarded full junior status and guaranteed 60 credits of transfer. Credits equivalent to the junior college’s requirements for the AA or AS degree (to a maximum of 66 credits) will be accepted only for grades of C or better. C-, D+ and D grades will not be accepted for any part of the maximum award. D grades may be used to bring the transfer credits to the guaranteed minimum level of 60 credits.

Students who have completed an AAS in nursing and who are enrolled in the RN to BS in nursing program may apply for up to 30 credits in nursing upon completion of the required nursing bridge course; this policy extends only to students enrolled in the RN to BS in nursing program. The 60-credit guarantee does not apply to those individuals who complete their associate degree after matriculating at Mount Saint Mary College.

Students may transfer a maximum of 90 acceptable credits from a baccalaureate program and must complete the remaining 30- credit minimum at Mount Saint Mary College, including at least 12 upper level credits in their majors. Students with an AAS in nursing who are in the RN to BS in nursing program are awarded full junior status an guaranteed 60 credits of transfer. Transfer courses or Mount Saint Mary College courses, used by a returning student after a significant absence, may not be used toward the degree if the courses are not consistent with current requirements. The specific courses affected by this policy will be identified and evaluated by the respective divisions.

12. Internships, Independent Studies

Internships and/or independent studies can be used to satisfy major or elective requirements for the baccalaureate degree. Independent Study is a course designed by the student and a faculty member. Such study is intended to give the student the responsibility and freedom in investigating subjects of special interest, expand knowledge beyond the limits of a given course, or allow upper level research. It may take a variety of forms, such as readings, art projects, research projects, or work evolving from another course. Independent Study is not intended to complete other courses.

No more than 18 credits in internships and independent studies combined can be used toward the degree. Of these 18 credits, a maximum of 6 credits may be applied to independent studies. At least 12 of the 18 credits must be used within the major. Divisions have the right to further limit the number of enrollments in internships and independent studies. Credit will not be awarded for work completed before registration for an internship or independent study.

In addition, students must meet the following additional requirements for independent studies: Have a minimum of 60 credits; have a minimum GPA of 2.75; develop and submit a proposed course outline to a faculty mentor; and meet the requirements of the division sponsoring the independent study.

13. Prerequisites

Students may not enroll in a course that is a prerequisite for a course already completed in general education, major or elective programs. There are three exceptions to this policy:

  1. Enrollment in lower level course by students with transfer credits, which do not follow the numbering sequence at Mount Saint Mary College, will be evaluated on an individual basis by the appropriate division chair;
  2. Students enrolled in the accelerated program may request waiver of a prerequisite requirement for a higher-level course due to scheduling difficulties. The prerequisite course will be scheduled when available;
  3. Students seeking an exception not covered may appeal to the Academic Standards Committee;
  4. Students may not register for a course if the prerequisite for that course has not been met or waived by the division chair. Students may request to transfer in prerequisite course work with the prior permission of an advisor and a division chairperson responsible for the course. In order for this course to be transferred in, the student must receive a grade of C or better from an issuing regionally accredited college. This grade will be calculated into the student’s Mount GPA. Once the student has completed the course, a signed permission slip and official transcript from the issuing college must be submitted to the Office of the Registrar. A student may then register for a required course.

14. Waivers

Waivers for Program Requirements

Waivers for courses required for degree programs are granted only under exceptional circumstances. The academic chairperson responsible for the course for which the waiver is requested is the only person authorized to grant a waiver. Students must obtain a Waiver Request Form from the Office of the Registrar and submit the request to their academic advisor with supporting documentation. If the academic advisor supports the student’s request, it will be forwarded to the appropriate chairperson for review. If approved, the chairperson will provide written approval to the Office of the Registrar. The approved course waiver will appear on the student’s transcript with a grade of “X” for the course and will not be calculated into the student’s Grade Point Average. In addition the waiver does not provide credit(s) toward degree completion. New York State has requirements regarding the minimum number of total credits and minimum number of liberal arts credits required for graduation. Students are expected to complete all degree requirements along with the required number of credits for their degree program.

Waivers for Core Requirements (General Education requirements)

The Waiver Request Form is available in the Office of the Registrar; both the student’s academic advisor and the chairperson of the academic division responsible for the course must support the request. Once the request has been approved by both faculty members, it is forwarded to the chair of the Academic Standards Committee for review. The committee’s decision is then forwarded to both the student and the Office of the Registrar.

15. Course Substitutions

Students are expected to complete all requirements of their individual degree programs. New York State has requirements regarding the minimum number of total credits and minimum number of liberal arts credits required for graduation. Students are expected to complete all degree requirements along with the required number of credits for their degree program. Only under exceptional circumstances may a course substitution be considered for certain degree requirements. Substitution requests must follow the specific approval process for the type of course substitution being requested. Only a course of equal or greater value may be considered for a substitution (i.e., only a 2000 level course or above may be used to substitute for another 2000 level course). If approved, the course substitution will appear on the academic transcript with a grade of “S” with no additional credits granted.

  1. Core Requirements (General Education requirements): The student must complete a Course Substitution Requirement form, available in the Office of the Registrar, and provide a written justification for the proposed substitution. The completed form is forwarded to both the student’s academic advisor and to the chairperson of the academic division responsible for the course. Both faculty members must support the request. It is then forwarded to the chair of the Academic Standards Committee for review and a final decision by the committee. The results of the committee’s action are forwarded to the student and to the Office of the Registrar for appropriate action.
  2. Major Requirements: The student must complete the Course Substitution Requirement form, available in the Office of the Registrar, and provide a written justification for the proposed substitution. The academic advisor must support the request.
    1. For course substitutions that involve a course in a disciplinary area overseen by the chariperson of the division offering the major, the chairperson of the division responsible for the course reveiws the request and renders a final descision.
    2. For course substitutions that involve a course in a disciplinary area overseen by a chairperson in a division other than the one offering the major, the chairperson of the division offering the major, in consultation with the chairperson of the division overseeing the course, shall determine whether the substitution meets the objectives of the required course.  The chairperson of the division offering the major shall document the consultation and render a final decision.

Second Bachelor’s Degree Candidates

Any applicant who has already completed a bachelor’s degree must apply as a transfer student following the procedures outlined for transfer students. The Office of Admissions reviews and approves applications for a second degree. The criteria for admission as a second-degree candidate are as follows:

  1. The intended major of the second degree must require at least 15 credits that were not contained in the major of the first degree.
  2. Second degree candidates receive a maximum of 90 credits in transfer; the number of liberal arts and upper division credits will be based on the courses taken in the first degree. All students are required to have completed all general education core courses.
  3. The student must complete a minimum of 30 credits in residence during the second matriculation.
  4. The student must complete a minimum of 12 upper- level credits in the major subject (unless otherwise stated by a particular major) which are to be completed at Mount Saint Mary College.
  5. It is the responsibility of the student to set up an appointment with an advisor of the intended major to discuss all requirements.

Collaborative Programs

Mount Saint Mary College offers a number of programs in collaboration with other colleges/universities. The collaborating institutions have designed the programs to meet high quality and rigorous academic standards. The Mount’s academic divisions consider only exceptional students for inclusion in collaborative programs: students who indicate a capability for graduate studies before completion of undergraduate studies.

Collaborative programs fall into two categories: articulation programs and affiliation programs. Articulation programs are agreements whereby the Mount student completes undergraduate studies in less than the traditional four-year period and begins graduate studies toward an advanced degree in what would otherwise be the fourth or senior year. Affiliation programs are agreements whereby a graduate institution will give preferential admissions consideration to Mount graduates who have met certain academic conditions.

Counseling or Mental Health Counseling (master’s degree) (3/2 articulation)

Students complete a dual/joint 5-year program leading to a Bachelor of Arts in psychology or human services from the Mount and a master’s degree in counseling or mental health counseling from Pace University. Students spend the first three years at the Mount taking courses to fulfill the requirements for a bachelor’s degree and the psychology or human services major, while establishing eligibility for admission into the master’s in counseling program at Pace. Students must reserve 12 credits of open electives in order to take four, 3-credit graduate courses during their fourth year. Psychology majors may also use six credits for the three electives at the 2000 level or above. The remaining 24 or 36 credits of the master’s program are taken at Pace.

Physical Therapy (doctorate) (4/3 affiliation)

Students graduating from the Mount with a bachelor’s degree in biology or psychology can be recommended for early acceptance to New York Medical College. Recommended students meeting NYMC’s admissions criteria must take the Graduate Record Examination. For more information, contact the Mount’s Division of Natural Sciences.

Podiatric Medicine (doctorate) (3/4 articulation)

Students who complete three years of prescribed course work at the Mount toward the bachelor’s degree in biology can be recommended for early admission to the New York College of Podiatric Medicine. At the end of their fourth year of study, students earn a bachelor’s degree from the Mount and, at the conclusion of the seventh year of study, the degree of Doctorate of Podiatric Medicine (DPM). For more information, contact the Mount’s Division of Natural Sciences.

Publishing (master’s) (3/2 articulation)

Students take all course work during their first three years at the Mount. In their senior year, students take two to three undergraduate courses per term at the Mount and two graduate courses per term at Pace University. The fifth year of study is exclusively at Pace. Students who successfully complete the course of study earn a bachelor’s degree in English from the Mount, and a master’s degree in publishing from Pace University in five years. For more information, contact the Mount’s Division of Arts and Letters.

Social Work (master’s) (3/2 Joint Degree)

Students who complete three years of prescribed course work at the Mount toward the bachelor’s degree with a major in human services, sociology, or psychology can be recommended for early admission to the Fordham University Graduate School of Social Services. At the end of their fourth year of study, students earn a bachelor’s degree from the Mount and at the conclusion of the fifth year of study, students earn a master’s degree in social work (MSW). For more information, contact the Mount’s Division of Social Sciences.

Academic Support

Academic Advisement

Academic advisement is the ongoing process of assisting students to learn to use the resources of Mount Saint Mary College to meet their individual needs and aspirations. To facilitate this process, each student who has declared a major is assigned by the division chair to a faculty member who acts as an academic advisor. Students in the teacher education program who have not declared a major will initially be advised by a member of the teacher education faculty and an advisor for undeclared majors. When such students declare a major, they will receive dual advisement from an assigned major advisor in addition to their education advisor. All other undeclared majors are assigned to an advisor by the Office of Student Success, who will serve as academic advisor until such time as they declare a major.

New students admitted to the College under special consideration status are assigned a faculty advisor from their academic major by the division chair and receive additional support services from the Special Consideration program and its administrator.

Transfer students receive an official evaluation of transfer credit once they have been accepted to the College. Upon acceptance, transfer students with a declared major are assigned an academic advisor from their major by the division chair. The Office of Student Success will assign an advisor to transfer students who are undeclared. With their academic advisor’s assistance, these students integrate their previous college experience and transfer credits into their chosen degree program.

All students must declare a major area of studies upon completion of 45 academic credits to ensure the proper development of their program. If a student decides to change a major, a new academic advisor will be assigned.

Students entering the College via non-traditional programs are assigned an academic advisor from their major by the division chairperson and receive additional support services from the program staff. Preliminary advisement is also available to new students before fall enrollment but final schedules are contingent upon placement test scores.

 

Adult Degree Completion Program Academic Advisement

Adult students who participate in ADC Programs are assigned to an academic advisor who will help to guide them through their academic experience.  The advisor provides academic guidance, access to resources, and assistance in navigating through the various departments on campus.  Student and advisor work together as a team throughout the academic journey from inquiry to graduation.  Beyond graduation, advisors (in conjunction with the Career Center) offer counsel in the job search and professional skills arena, such as providing interview skills and resume writing workshops, etc.

 

Developmental Coursework

The College shall make a commitment to all full-time students to provide the opportunity to complete a degree program of the College within four years. The need for developmental courses, however, may extend the time required to complete a degree. Students must bear the costs associated with these courses. Thus, students may be eligible for the Supplemental Tuition Assistance Program (STAP) and the Tuition Assistance Program (TAP) and federal programs.

Students enrolled in developmental courses must take an exit exam at the end of the course to evaluate whether or not they have achieved the College’s standard for minimal competency. A need for additional developmental work may be determined by the exit exam or the course instructor. Although grades in developmental are not included in a student’s Cumulative Grade Point Average (GPA), these grades will be included in determining academic standing in a student’s first semester at the Mount. Students who fail a developmental course twice will be reviewed for possible academic dismissal. Students enrolled in developmental courses are expected to observe the same regulations regarding credit-bearing courses, specifically concerning attendance and academic honesty.

Service Learning

Service Learning at Mount Saint Mary College is either an academic component (curricular) of a credit-bearing course or an educational enrichment of student activities (co-curricular) on campus. Service Learning enables students to learn and develop through thoughtfully organized community service that fosters civic responsibility while enhancing the academic curriculum through real world experience, application of theory, and integration through critical reflective thinking.

Opportunities to participate in service learning are available in selected courses throughout the disciplines and/or through student activities.

 

THE LIBRARY

The Kaplan Family Library and Learning Center is the hub of information and research at Mount Saint Mary College. Located on the first two floors of the Dominican Center, the library plays an integral role in the academic experience of every student.

The newly designed library space, which opened in January 2014, offers a wide variety of seating and workspace options where students can work together or individually on all aspects of their projects and assignments. In addition to designated quiet study areas in the stacks, the library offers space for discussion and collaborative work. There are also six study/presentation rooms equipped with the latest in presentation and collaboration technology, where students can practice presentations, work on group projects, or study in solitude.  These rooms can be reserved in advance or used on a drop-in basis.

Library faculty and staff offer MSMC students expert assistance with research and information technology. Librarians teach information literacy skills through the First Year Experience program, course-integrated instruction, individual assistance at the Information Desk, and in-depth, one-on-one research consultations tailored to a student’s specific needs.

The library collection includes close to 80,000 books, more than 8,000 videos/dvd’s, and 200+ current journal subscriptions. In addition, the library web page (http://www.msmc.edu/library) provides access to approximately 75 online research databases, 11,000+ e-books, and 50,000+ full-text journals, newspapers, and magazines. The site also guides students through the research process and helps them prepare bibliographies, evaluate information sources, and avoid plagiarism. The library web page serves as a portal to many library services, including the online library catalog, electronic reserves, online interlibrary loan requests, and research assistance via e-mail.

The Kaplan Family Library and Learning Center supports student learning by providing a technology-rich learning environment, as well as traditional research resources and services, within a comfortable space specifically tailored to the needs of today’s students. There are more than 70 internet workstations located throughout the library, as well as five high-volume, high-speed printers.

The Curriculum Materials Center (CMC) is located on the first floor of the library. It provides print, electronic, and media resources to support the curriculum and instructional activities of the MSMC education program. The emphasis of the CMC is on practical materials that can be used for curriculum planning, lesson preparation and teaching, and pupil assessment. The collection of nearly 9,000 items includes books for children and young adults, textbooks, educational games, models, mathematics and science manipulatives, assessment tools, and New York State curriculum guides. Computer workstations in the CMC permit students to do research as well as use specialized educational software.

Kaplan Library is open until midnight five nights/week when classes are in session and until 2:00 a.m. during exam periods. The south wing of the library (including the computer lab, café seating, and other seating areas) is open to all students 24 hours a day during the regular spring and fall semesters.  The complete schedule of hours can be found on the library web page. The library can also be reached by phone at 845-569-3600.

A valid MSMC ID card is required to borrow books and other items. As an incentive for the timely return of library materials, and in recognition of the library as a shared resource for the entire campus, fines are charged for overdue and lost materials, including reserve items. Theft of or damage to library materials may result in disciplinary action. Students are expected to comply with all library policies in order to retain library borrowing privileges

Tutoring 

The Office of Student Success offers free tutorial assistance in major subject areas and skill areas (reading, writing, study and research methods).

Academic Standards

The Academic Standards Committee will review all students’ academic progress at the end of each full time semester (fall or spring) as well as at the end of the summer for students who take summer classes. A student may be placed on probation by the Academic Standards Committee, and will no longer be in Good Academic Standing. Among the factors the committee shall consider when reviewing a student’s progress are:

  1. Failure to fulfill entrance conditions;
  2. Failure to attain a semester GPA of 1.75 in any semester. The semester GPA is the weighted average of the student’s academic standing for one semester as measured by the reported grades and weighted according to credit and letter grade values. Grade Point Equivalents will be used for developmental courses during the semester GPA point average calculations; these values will not be included in cumulative GPAs;
  3. Failure to attain satisfactory grades in courses required in the major program for which the student is enrolled;
  4. Failure to attain sufficient credits and grade point averages required for sophomore, junior or senior status. To advance in academic status, a student must meet the following requirements.    

Grade Point Average and Status

Students with fewer than 30 credits need to maintain a cumulative GPA of at least 1.85. All other students need to maintain a cumulative GPA of at least 2.00. The following table will be used as a guideline in determining academic standing based on cumulative GPA, but students will generally have at least one semester on probation as an opportunity to raise their GPAs before being academically dismissed.

Credits Good Standing (GPA) Monitored (GPA) Probation (GPA) Dismissal (GPA)
0-15 1.85 or greater 1.75-1.84 1.00-1.74 0.99 or less
16-30 1.85 or greater 1.75-1.84 1.50-1.74 1.49 or less
31-60 2.00 or greater 1.86-1.99 1.65-1.85 1.64 or less
61+ 2.00 or greater 1.94-1.99 1.80-1.93 1.79 or less

Monitored Program

This program of studies must be approved by a division chair or advisor. It must be restricted to 12 credits (maximum of 13 credits for students enrolled in an approved laboratory course, a practicum or physical education) and may include developmental studies. Students on monitored status are permitted to participate in varsity athletics. If the student has fulfilled the requirements imposed by the Academic Standards Committee, the individual will return to good standing.

Academic Probation

Placement on probation is a serious warning to students that unless their academic record is improved they may be dismissed. The usual duration of academic probation is a traditional semester (12 credits). At the end of the semester, the Academic Standards Committee reviews the student’s progress. If the student has fulfilled the requirements imposed by the Academic Standards Committee, the individual will be reinstated as a student in good standing. Following two semesters on probation students will be considered for Academic Dismissal. The student must be informed of the probation by a written communication from the Academic Standards Committee. Students on probation will be restricted to 12 credits (13 for students enrolled in an approved laboratory course, a practicum or physical education). Students on probation are not permitted to participate in varsity athletics. This policy conforms to current NCAA regulations relative to ineligibility of student-athletes on probation. If the student has fulfilled the requirements imposed by the Academic Standards Committee, the individual will return to good standing. 

The College provides structures of academic support to students in academic jeopardy to assist in their return to good academic standing. Students who are deemed to be in academic jeopardy by the Academic Standards Committee are directed to the Office of Student Success for the appropriate support, including academic coaching. The student’s academic advisor is also informed. The CSS tracks student participation.

For transfer students bringing in 15 or more credits, their first semester will be evaluated using the criteria for students with 0-15 credits. After their first semester, transfer students will be evaluated using their total credits earned.

Academic Dismissal

The College reserves the right to dismiss a student who fails to make reasonable progress toward the completion of the degree and the program in which the individual is enrolled. The Academic Standards Committee may recommend dismissal. The student may submit a written appeal of a dismissal decision within two weeks to the Associate VPAA, as chair of the College’s Appeals Committee. The College also reserves the right to require the withdrawal of a student at any time if the individual’s conduct does not conform to its spirit and standards. When considering dismissal, the committee will review the factors stated under a-d above, as well as whether a student has incurred probation twice. Students who fail a developmental course twice will be reviewed for possible academic dismissal. A student’s academic standing or status will be determined by one’s ability or failure to maintain the institution’s academic standards as described above.

Academic Honesty

College Position

The mission of Mount Saint Mary College is concerned with “…the development of sound values, goals and commitments on the part of students. Equipping students to play responsible roles in society has been a consistent aim of our institution.” Instances of academic dishonesty subvert the mission of the College and the experience students derive from it. These instances harm the offender as well as students who maintain academic honesty. The Mount community, therefore, commits itself to do all in its power to prevent such dishonesty and imposes impartial sanctions upon those who harm themselves, their fellow students and the College in this way.

Definitions

Generally, academic dishonesty may be defined in the following ways:

  1. Cheating: using or attempting to use, giving or attempting to give, unauthorized materials, information, assistance or study aids in any academic exercise or evaluation (tests), unless the nature of the academic exercise legitimizes cooperative learning;
  2. Plagiarism: copying or imitating the language, ideas or thoughts of another person, and passing off the same as one’s original work;
  3. Falsification: forgery, alteration or misuse of academic documents, records or forms.

Prevention of Academic Dishonesty

Both students and faculty members should be alert to academic dishonesty and should work diligently to eliminate situations that foster academic dishonesty. Students have an obligation to make their abhorrence of it known to their peers. Faculty members have an obligation to create a classroom atmosphere that encourages careful proctoring of examinations and monitoring of papers. Other professional staff should encourage honesty in a manner dictated by the nature of their interactions with students.

Due Process

In any allegation of academic dishonesty, every effort will be made to ensure due process. Due process is defined as a course of formal proceedings carried out regularly and in accordance with established rules and principles. Thus, in the unfortunate event of an alleged breach of academic honesty, the student so charged will be insured due process as follows:

  1. Immediately if possible, but not later than two school days, after the alleged incident or the awareness of academic dishonesty, the instructor presents to the student the specific charge with supporting evidence. This charge, if given orally and/or in writing, should include the nature of alleged academic dishonesty (cheating, plagiarism, falsification); the date, time, description of the incident; the action that was taken by the instructor at the time of the incident.
  2. The instructor meets with student and permits the student to respond to the charge with facts and mitigating circumstances relating to the alleged incident of academic dishonesty. If, after hearing the student’s response, the instructor concludes that the student is culpable of the allegation, the instructor has the authority to impose a sanction on the student. (See Section V, Sanctions, of this policy.) The nature of the sanction is communicated to the student, the Vice President for Academic Affairs (VPAA), and the chair of the division.
  3. Appeal of the instructor’s decision: Within three school days after the student has been notified of the instructor’s decision, the student may appeal in writing to the chair of the division to which the faculty member belongs.The division chair will initiate the development of an Appeals Committee. The Appeals Committee will consist of three teaching faculty members who, in the opinion of the division chair, are competent to evaluate the appeal. The division chair will be one of the three members unless that person is the faculty member who charged the student with academic dishonesty.
  4. The Appeals Committee will designate one of its members to serve as chair of the committee. The Appeals Committee has the authority to hear the case, to rule on procedure for the hearing, to impose or alter sanctions on the student and to communicate the findings of the committee to the student and to the faculty member and the VPAA or designate. The case must be decided by a majority vote within 48 hours of conclusion of the hearing by the Appeals Committee.
  5. A student who has been penalized for academic dishonesty and who believes that he/she has not been accorded the rights stated in this policy may seek an appeal of the Committee’s decision from the vice president for academic affairs. If in the judgment of the vice president for academic affairs, an appeal hearing is warranted, the VPAA will convene an administrative Appeals Board. This Board will consist of the VPAA, the chair of the Faculty Senate, and the Dean of Student Affairs. Such an appeal must be made in writing within 14 school days after the student has been notified of the Appeals Committee decision. Failure by the student to appeal the decision of the Appeals Committee on a timely basis shall constitute a waiver of the student’s right to appeal. The appeal must be based on one or more of the following grounds: (The student was not accorded due process as described in this policy.The student has new evidence that was not available or was unknown at the time of the Appeals Committee hearing. The administrative Appeals Board will review and make the final disposition of the case. The decision of this Appeals Board will be final and binding.
  6. Conduct of appeals hearing:  Both the student and the faculty member must be present at each appeals hearing, i.e., Appeals Committee and administrative Appeals Board. Both the student and the faculty member may have counsel at each appeals hearing. Persons providing counsel may advise students and faculty, and may be present during, but not participate in, the hearings. Both the student and the faculty member may present his/her case, and hear and question all witnesses during an appeals hearing.
  7. The student will receive a written report of the findings and the decision at each level of the appeal process. Copies of this written report will be given to the faculty member, the VPAA, and the Registrar.
  8. Sanctions: In cases where culpability is established, the student is to be accorded the opportunity to enter mitigating circumstances through the student’s own testimony and that of any witnesses the student produces. Such testimony may be made during the meeting with the faculty member and during an appeals hearing. In cases where culpability is established, the following sanctions will be imposed:

1. For an initial transgression, and where culpability is established, the student will face sanctions up to and including failure for the course. In addition, a memo detailing the infraction must be forwarded by the instructor to the Registrar to be placed in the student’s file.

2. If the Registrar determines that this is the second infraction on the part of a student with fewer than 30 credits, the case will be referred to the VPAA before any action is taken.

3. If the Registrar determines that this is a second infraction on the part of a student with more than 30 credits, the penalty is immediate failure of the course. The Registrar will inform the student and the instructor of the failing grade in the course.

4. A third infraction will result in academic dismissal from the College.

Enrollment Status

Matriculation

Students who are admitted to the Mount in a degree-seeking program will be considered matriculated and will be assessed a matriculation fee (payable during the second semester of the entering year) after completing a full-time semester at the Mount. The College requires that all candidates for matriculation must have:

  • Completed all admissions requirements of the College;
  • An appropriate GPA (see table under Academic Standards).

To advance in academic status, a student must complete the minimum credits and attain the specific grade index associated with the individual’s particular status.

Students who break their matriculation for more than one calendar year from the date of departure and who present themselves to return to the College must comply with the general education and all requirements in place at the time of the approved leave of absence. Students seeking exceptions must petition the Academic Standards Committee. Students cannot mix the requirements of two catalogs.

Withdrawal from the Mount

There may be times when a student feels uncertain about continuing his/her academic experience at Mount Saint Mary College. Such feelings need to be considered carefully and may be discussed with the student’s academic advisor and/or counselor. Often these feelings arise as a result of a situation in the student’s academic or personal life that can be resolved.

If a student determines, however, that withdrawal from college, either temporarily or permanently, is the best course of action, the student must schedule an exit interview with the academic advisor. Students who withdraw from the College are also required to submit a signed student withdrawal form. This form is available at the Office of the Registrar, and, when completed, should be returned to the Registrar. The form needs to be signed by the advisor and members of the offices of Student Accounts, Financial Aid, Residence Life, the Registrar, and the Dean of Student Affairs. Students unable to complete the form are required to notify the Registrar in writing; failure to do so may result in academic and or/financial penalty. The College refund policy concerning the refund of tuition and fees is listed in the section “Tuition and Fees” in this catalog. The withdrawal form is not official until it is completed and submitted to the Registrar. Note: when withdrawing after the last day to withdraw without academic penalty, students will receive “F” grades in all classes, and may be subject to academic probation.

Medical Leave/Course Withdrawal

Voluntary Medical or Mental Health Course Withdrawal and Leave Policy

 

Course Withdrawals for Medical or Mental Health Reasons

When a student has significant medical or mental health concerns, or has had extenuating circumstances (e.g., a tragedy in the family), he or she may request a course withdrawal(s) by submitting: 1) a completed Voluntary Medical Leave/Course Withdrawal Request form  and 2) appropriate documentation from a qualified health professional to the Director of Health Services. The request must be received prior to the end of the current semester.

The Director of Health Services will consider the student’s request, and make a determination as to whether the request for the leave is appropriate. If the request is deemed appropriate, the Director of Health Services will recommend a course withdrawal for medical reasons to the Office of the Registrar and the Office of Academic Affairs. Students may first be encouraged to consult with their instructors or advisors to determine if there are alternative methods to alleviate their academic workload before obtaining a course withdrawal.

If a student is not granted a withdrawal(s) he/she may submit a written appeal, within two weeks of receiving the decision, to the Assistant Vice-President for Academic Affairs (AVPAA). The AVPAA will review the appeal in consultation with the Vice-President for Academic Affairs, and their decision regarding the request will be final. If a request is denied, the College catalog policies will apply, based upon the original date the Voluntary Medical Leave/Course Withdrawal Request form was originally submitted.

If the student’s recommended course withdrawal is approved due to medical or mental health reasons, he/she may withdraw from a course, even after the official drop period has ended, and without academic penalty. The student will be given a waiver for tuition charges for the course he/she withdrew from, which may be used to offset the cost of tuition when he/she next registers for courses at the College. Should the student not register for future courses, no refund of tuition charges will be given.

Leaves from the College for Medical or Mental Health Reasons

When a student has significant medical or mental health concerns or has had extenuating circumstances (e.g., a tragedy in the family), he or she may request a Medical Leave from the College, by submitting: 1) a completed Voluntary Medical Leave/Course Withdrawal Request form,  and 2) the appropriate documentation from a qualified health professional to the Director of Health Services.  The request must be received prior to the end of the current semester.

The Director of Health Services will consider the student’s request, and make a determination as to whether the request is appropriate. If the request is deemed appropriate, the Director of Health Services will recommend to the Office of the Registrar and the Office of Academic Affairs that the medical leave be granted to the student. Students may first be encouraged to consult with their instructors or advisors to determine if there are alternative methods to alleviate their academic workload before obtaining a Medical Leave.

If a student is not granted a Medical Leave, he/she may submit a written appeal, within two weeks of receiving the decision, to the AVPAA. The AVPAA will review the appeal in consultation with the Vice-President for Academic Affairs and their decision regarding the request will be final. If a request is denied the College catalog policies will apply, based upon the original date the Voluntary Medical Leave/Course Withdrawal Request form was originally submitted.

A student recommended for and granted a Medical Leave will be withdrawn from all current courses he or she is registered for, even after the official withdrawal period has ended and without academic penalty. Additionally, a student on Medical Leave will receive a one-year Maintenance of Matriculation that allows the student to return without having to re-apply or pay another application fee. The student will be responsible for meeting 100% of his/her fees and room charges, as outlined in the College catalog. The student’s board will be prorated. If the student receives financial aid funding, a portion of their federal student aid may have to be returned. A calculation will be run based on current federal student aid guidelines.

If the student intends to return to the College to complete his/her degree, the student will be given a waiver for tuition charges to offset the cost of tuition upon his/her return. Should the student not return to the college to complete his/her degree, no refund of tuition charges will be given. If away for more than one year, the student would be subject to the catalog requirements in place at the time of return.

When a student wants to return to the College, he/she will be required to submit to the Director of Health Services appropriate documentation from a qualified health professional stating that the student has been cleared to return.  It is recommended that he/she schedule a meeting with the Director of Health Services to review any relevant matters about this transition. If a student returning from a medical leave requires a reasonable accommodation in order to meet the essential eligibility requirements for MSMC students, MSMC will attempt to accommodate him/her as outlined in the MSMC Student Handbook.  If the student is not approved to return to the College, he/she may submit a written appeal, within two weeks of receiving the decision, to the AVPAA.  The AVPAA will review the appeal in consultation with the Vice-President for Academic Affairs, and their decision regarding the request will be final.

Leave of Absence Policy

A leave of absence from the College may be granted to students for reasons other than academic difficulties for up to one full year after the end of the semester in progress. Students who do not intend to return in a subsequent semester must file for a Leave of Absence in order to remain classified as an “active” student. The leave requires approval by the academic advisors and the Registrar, and begins after the end of the semester in progress. Students requesting a leave of absence need to complete the Leave of Absence/Withdrawal Form available in the Office of the Registrar. The student must indicate his/her intended date of return to the College on the form. If the student does not return to the College on or before the appropriate date, he/she will be considered as having withdrawn from the College.

A student returning from a Leave of Absence MUST meet all requirements in place at the time of the approved leave of absence as long as the student returns within two academic semesters. Students taking a Leave of Absence who have received loans should consult the Financial Aid Office for information about loan repayment obligations. Filing for a Leave of Absence does not preclude suspension or dismissal at the conclusion of a semester. Students who were placed on probation at the time they took a leave of absence will, upon their return, continue to be on probation, and will be required to meet the conditions set by the College while they are on probation.

Returning to the Mount

Students who break their matriculation for more than one calendar year from the date of departure and who would like to return to Mount Saint Mary College must submit an Application to Return to Mount Saint Mary College to the Registrar for a declared major. Students who were previously under an academic probationary status are subject to the conditions of that status upon return. Permission to return or request for admission into a specific major is not guaranteed and will be based upon the review. Upon approval from the Registrar, students may register for class. Any course work completed while away from the Mount will be reviewed for possible credit upon receipt of official transcripts. All students must complete the general education and major requirements in place at the time of re-entry. Student cannot mix requirements of two different catalogs. Students seeking any exception must petition the Academic Standards Committee.

Grading

The quantitative measure of a student’s scholastic standing is the Grade Point Average (GPA) or the weighted average of the student’s academic standing as measured by the reported grades and weighted according to credit and letter value.

The college uses the following grading system (quality points are indicated under the grade or to the right):

A   A- B+ B B- C+ C C- D+ D
4.0   3.67 3.33 3.0 2.67 2.33 2.0 1.67 1.33 1.0
       
P - Passing 0.0
F - Failure 0.0
I - Incomplete (absent from final exam and/or incomplete required course work) 0.0
S - Exempted, course requirement has been substituted, no credit 0.0
W - Withdrawal during the period from the second week of class to the third week after the mid-semester date 0.0
AW - Administrative Withdrawal – for a student who fails to attend class before the end of the add/drop period. 0.0

Any sophomore, junior, or senior in good academic standing with a GPA of 2.2 may take advantage of the P/F grading system through the first two weeks of the semester. The Registrar will receive a form with notification of the student’s choice of electives for P/F grading and at the end of the semester will change the letter grade received from the instructor to Pass (for A, B, C, or D) or Fail (F). The P course shall not be used in computing the GPA.

The Incomplete (I) grade is used only when a student has met the class attendance requirements of a course and must postpone the completion of certain papers, reports, or other assignments for reasons beyond the individual’s control (individual or family health or emergency problems). The student must obtain the proper request form from the Registrar and submit a written request to the instructor for a grade of I . After reviewing the student’s record, the instructor will determine the validity of the request in light of the reasons stated above and approve or deny the I grade. Approved I grade requests will be submitted with the Grade Report. The Registrar will monitor all requests for appropriate justification.

At the time the I grade is requested, the student and the faculty member will agree on a date by which the course work must be completed. Incomplete grades will generally be resolved by the fifth week of the following academic semester. All incomplete grades must be changed by the tenth week of classes for graduating seniors or the day before the final examinations for all other students. If the grade is not changed by the date on the request form, the I grade will be changed to an F grade.

If the student is not awarded an Incomplete and the student believes the required conditions have been met, a written appeal may be presented to the division chair responsible for the course, and the Registrar. The division chair will evaluate the case and inform the student, the instructor, and the Registrar of the decision. If the division chair is the instructor, the VPAA will appoint a senior faculty member within the division to hear the student’s appeal. The decision is final with no further appeal.

If a student voluntarily repeats a course, the better of the two grades will be used for the purpose of calculating the GPA and for meeting degree requirements. If the student withdraws from the course during the withdrawal period, the student will retain the first entered grade, which will be used in all calculations. The student’s record will show that the course was repeated and the final grades for each time will be shown. Consult the Tuition Assistance Program in the Financial Aid section of this catalog for financial aid regulations regarding repeating a course.

A minimum semester GPA of 1.75 is required each semester.

Nursing students must attain at least a grade of C+ in required nursing and health courses. Education certification students must attain at least a GPA of 2.75 in required certification courses.

Candidates for a degree must attain a GPA of 1.85 by the end of the freshman year, and a 2.0 by the end of the sophomore year and each succeeding semester.

For class ranking purposes, when there is a tie in cumulative Grade Point Averages, with two or more students, the number of credits successfully taken at Mount Saint Mary College will be the tie-breaker; the student(s) with more institutional credits will be ranked higher.

Evaluation

In evaluating the learning experiences provided by a semester of study, instructors may choose a variety of procedures; among these may be written or oral examinations, projects, practicums or theses. The course requirements and methods of evaluation are stated in writing and distributed by the instructor at the beginning of the semester.

Grade Appeal

A student who believes that the grade he/she has received in any subject is in error should initiate the procedure outlined below. If the student is dissatisfied with the response at any step, he/she should proceed to the next specified step within two weeks following the issuance of the unfavorable response.

Step 1: The student should discuss the case with the instructor before the third week of the next regular semester following the one in which he/she received the grade.

Step 2: The student should submit a written appeal to the instructor giving a rationale for the grade change and providing supporting information.

Step 3: The student should submit the written appeal and supporting evidence to the chair of the division offering the course in question.

The hearing of the appeal will proceed as follows:

  1. The division chair will form an Appeals Committee. The Appeals Committee will consist of three teaching faculty members who, in the opinion of the division chair, are competent to evaluate the appeal and the subject matter of the course.
  2. The committee will designate one of its members to serve as the chair. The chair will monitor the hearings, rule on procedure, and communicate the findings of the committee to the student and college officials. The division chair will be one of the three members, unless that person is the instructor against whom the grievance has been brought. Both the student and the faculty member must be present at the presentation of the appeal to the committee.
  3. In a case where the faculty member against whom the grievance is made cannot be contacted due to change in employment, death, etc., the vice president for academic affairs will be empowered to take the place of the faculty member and will change the course grade if the Appeals Committee decides in favor of the student. Both the student and the faculty member may have counsel at the hearing. The case must be decided by a majority vote within the semester during which the appeal is initiated. The decisions of the Appeals Committee are final and binding. They will be communicated to the student in writing by the chair of the Appeals Committee with copies sent to the faculty member, the VPAA, and the Registrar.

Honors Standing

Three grades of honors are awarded at commencement to those graduates who have maintained a superior level of achievement during the entire undergraduate program:

Summa Cum Laude, or highest honors, is awarded to those having a GPA of 3.80 and no grade below B for all course work;

Magna Cum Laude, or high honors, is awarded to those having a GPA of 3.60 and no grade below C;

Cum Laude, or with honor, is awarded to those having a GPA of 3.40 or above.

Scholars

In order to foster scholarly activity and to recognize academic achievement, the faculty, upon the recommendation of the Academic Standards Committee, may confer the title of Aquinas Scholar or Ralph Scholar. These scholars must have attained a high degree of proficiency in their studies and have demonstrated initiatives and/or activities that exemplify a sincere commitment to learning at Mount Saint Mary College. The candidates must be enrolled as full-time students.

The title Aquinas Scholar is awarded to juniors or seniors who have completed at least 30 credits at Mount Saint Mary College. The students must have attained a minimum GPA of 3.60 and have received the recommendation and approval of the division in which their major is offered. Only up to 5% of the students per division per class, or three students per division per class, whichever number is larger, may be nominated.

The title Ralph Scholar is awarded to sophomores who have completed at least 30 credits, 24 of them at Mount Saint Mary College, in the freshman year. Students must have attained a GPA of 3.40 and have received the recommendation of at least two faculty members. Ralph Scholars may be nominated by any individual faculty member on the basis of overall freshman performance, not as divisional majors. Only 5% of the class may be named.

Dean’s List

The Dean’s List is announced at the end of each semester. The Dean’s List includes the names of students who have carried at least 12 graded credits in a semester. A minimum semester GPA of 3.50 in the graded courses is required.

Students with unresolved I grades will not be considered for academic awards. Only students with resolved I grades due to emergencies (illness or family) or due to the nature of the course will be retroactively considered for the Dean’s List.

Honor Societies

Alpha Chi is a national college honor scholarship society for full-time juniors and seniors of all disciplines. The purpose of the organization is to promote and recognize academic excellence and exemplary character. Among requirements for admission is that a student must rank in the highest 10% of the class. The New York State Kappa Chapter of Alpha Chi was established at Mount Saint Mary College in 1981.

Alpha Sigma Lambda is the honor society for adult students in continuing higher education. The Gamma Iota Chapter was established at Mount Saint Mary College in 1982. Alpha Sigma Lambda is dedicated to the advancement of scholarship and leadership, and recognizes the high scholastic achievement of the adult learner in light of the competing interests of home and work on the academic life of the non-traditional student. The Chapter’s members are selected from the highest 20% of adult students who have met eligibility criteria, including a minimum GPA of 3.2.

Beta Beta Beta is the national biological honor society; it was established at Mount Saint Mary College in 1975. Active membership in the Lambda Theta chapter is open to biology majors who have completed the first semester of their sophomore year and attained a Grade Point Average of 3.0 or better in all courses in biology; active membership is considered to be evidence of superior scholastic and professional achievement. Associate membership is open to all students interested in the life sciences. The society strives to stimulate scholarship, promote biological research and disseminate scientific knowledge.

Chi Alpha Epsilon (XAE) National Honor Society recognizes academic achievements of students admitted through non-traditional criteria and serves developmental, Student Support Services, McNair Scholars, and Educational Opportunity Program students. Its purpose is to promote continued high academic standards, increased communication among its members, and honor academic excellence.

Delta Mu Delta is an international honor society, which was established in 1913 to recognize academic excellence in both undergraduate and graduate business and accounting programs. The Epsilon Iota Chapter was established at Mount Saint Mary College in 1989. Induction in Delta Mu Delta brings lifetime membership and the highest international recognition that a business student can earn. Undergraduate students with a GPA of 3.25 or higher (3.6 or higher for graduate students) who are also within the top 20% of their class and have completed one-half of their required course work for their degree with at least 24 of those credits taken at the Mount are eligible to apply.

Gamma Nu Eta is the national honor society in Information Technology.  The Epsilon Chapter was established at Mount Saint Mary College in 2016 to recognize and encourage excellence in the field of Information Technology among students and to foster scholarship, leadership, and community involvement within its membership.  Members are chosen from students of information technology and other closely related fields who are strong academically and demonstrate leadership, campus involvement and excellent character.  All students who have completed the required number of information technology courses and have earned the required overall GPA and required GPA in the major are eligible.

Gamma Sigma Epsilon is a national honor society in chemistry. The Kappa Epsilon chapter was established at Mount Saint Mary College in 1999. The purpose of the society is to recognize outstanding academic achievement in chemistry and to increase interest, scholarship and research in the discipline. Students who have completed a minimum of 16 credits in chemistry with a minimum Grade Point Average of 3.0, and a 3.00 GPA in chemistry courses, are eligible for membership.

Kappa Delta Pi is the International Honor Society in Education. The Sigma Tau Chapter was established at Mount Saint Mary College in 1992. Kappa Delta Pi promotes excellence in, and recognizes outstanding contributions to, education. The society endeavors to maintain a high degree of professional fellowship among its members, quicken professional growth and honor achievement in educational work. Active membership is open to upper-class and graduate students who have completed the appropriate number of credits with the required scholastic average. Membership is open to Mount alumni and faculty.

Kappa Mu Epsilon is the honor society in mathematics. The Pi Chapter was founded at Mount Saint Mary College in 2007 to promote interest in mathematics among undergraduate students. Chapters are located in colleges and universities of recognized standing that offer a strong mathematics major. The chapters’ members are selected from students of mathematics and other closely related fields who have maintained standards of scholarship, have professional merit, and have attained academic distinction.

Lambda Pi Eta is the communication arts honor society of the National Communication Association. The Phi Pi Chapter was established at Mount Saint Mary College in 2007. Eligibility for membership is open to students in communications majors who have completed a minimum of 12 credits in the major while maintaining a GPA of 3.0 and GPA in the major of 3.25. Phi Pi recognizes scholarship in communication studies; promotes and encourages professional development; provides for opportunities to discuss ideas in the fields of communication; and provides opportunities to be of service to the community.

Phi Alpha Theta is the International Honor Society of History. It was established at Mount Saint Mary College in 1993. Phi Alpha Theta is a professional society whose purpose is to promote the study of history through the encouragement of research, good teaching, publication, and the exchange of learning and ideas among historians. All students who have completed the required number of history courses and are maintaining high standards in their college studies are eligible.

Psi Chi is the National Honor Society in Psychology, founded in 1929 for the purpose of encouraging, stimulating, and maintaining excellence in scholarship, and advancing the science of psychology. Membership is open to graduate and undergraduate men and women who are making the study of psychology one of their major interests, and who meet the minimum qualifications. Psi Chi was established at Mount Saint Mary College in 1994.

Sigma Delta Pi, the National Collegiate Hispanic Honor Society, is a non-profit organization incorporated in the State of South Carolina, a member of the Association of College Honor Societies and partners with the American Association of Teachers of Spanish and Portuguese, Estudio Internacional Sampere, the Instituto Universitario de Investigación en Estudios Norteamericanos Benjamin Franklin, the Universidad Veritas, the International Association of Hispanists, and the North American Academy of the Spanish Language. The honor society was founded at the University of California, Berkeley in 1919.

Sigma Tau Delta is the International Honor Society for English studies. The Alpha Mu Upsilon Chapter of Sigma Tau Delta was established at Mount Saint Mary College in 2005 with the mission to confer distinction upon full-time students of English language and literature and to promote a community of scholars dedicated to learning and to service. Eligibility is limited to students who have earned a GPA of 3.0 and a 3.25 GPA as an English major or minor. Members of Sigma Tau Delta have the opportunity not only to be recognized for their outstanding achievements but also to be enriched in their education and helped in their careers.

Sigma Theta Tau is the International Honor Society of Nursing. The Mu Epsilon Chapter was chartered in 1989. The purpose of Mu Epsilon is to recognize superior achievement and leadership, to foster high professional standards, to encourage creative work, and to strengthen commitment to the ideals and purposes of the nursing profession. Eligibility in Mu Epsilon is determined by several criteria including grade point average, leadership qualities, scholarship and contributions to the nursing profession. Membership in Mu Epsilon is by invitation to upper-class nursing students, faculty and community leaders in nursing.

Tau Upsilon Alpha is the national Honor Society for Human Services. The Alpha Omicron chapter was established at Mount Saint Mary College in 2012.  It’s mission is to honor academic excellence, to foster lifelong learning, leadership and development, and to promote excellence in service to humanity.

Honors Program

The Honors Program at Mount Saint Mary College offers high-achieving students the opportunity to work with their peers to enhance their educational experience. Admission into the program is by invitation from the Director of the Honors Program. Freshmen qualify on the basis of exemplary high school records, a composite score on college proficiency exams and SATs (or ACTs) that indicate the student’s ability to meet the rigors and challenges of honors-level course work.

Students seeking to participate in the program after the fall term of the freshman year, as well as transfers students, qualify for consideration based on the following criteria: they have attained a GPA of 3.4 after a minimum of 15 credits taken at the Mount and they are recommended by a faculty member.

Oversight

The Honors Program is overseen by the Faculty Honors Council, the Director of the Honors Program and the Assistant VPAA . This council includes the Assistant VPAA, the Director of the Honors Program and faculty from each division, as well as a student representative. This student representative is an elected member of the Student Honors Council, a student-led organization that is the voice of Honors students on campus.

Types of Honors Courses

There are three types of Honors courses through which a student can earn Honors credit. First, HON designated courses are designed specifically for the Honors program, and the entire class is assumed to be in the Honors program. These courses are usually Honors versions of courses that fulfill requirements in the General Education curriculum (e.g. Introduction to Psychology, World Religions, etc.).

Second, Honors-by-Contract courses are those made through individual contracts between a faculty member and an Honors student in courses for which there is not an Honors section. Each contract must be developed by the student and faculty member and submitted for approval to the Associate VPAA before the Drop/Add date of the semester in which the course is taken.

Third, a student may register for an Honors Tutorial, which is associated with regularly-scheduled course, and which combines the advantages of dedicated Honors sections with the Honors-by-contract model. If offered during the term, students register a traditional version of the course and a separate zero-credit section of Honors Tutorial. In addition to meeting with the regular class, Honors students meet, as a group, with the instructor for at least an additional 10 hours over the course of the semester. In this type of course the Honors students benefit from the collective learning of a classroom in courses for which there are insufficient students to warrant a dedicated Honors section. (A minimum of five Honors students is required for this option.)

Academic Progress

The student is responsible for the selection of, enrollment in, and completion of a minimum of 18 Honors credits over four years. It is recommended that Honors students taking only the minimum number of credits to qualify for the completion of the program take 6-9 Honors credits in the freshman year and the remaining credits in subsequent years. Students must complete one interdisciplinary HON 3000-level theme-based course and one culminating 4000 level Honors research/project course to satisfy program requirements. The Registrar, in consultation with the VPAA and the Honors Program Director must approve Honors courses transferred from other institutions.

To maintain their status in the Honors Program, students will need to demonstrate that they are making “satisfactory progress” towards earning the 18 credits necessary for graduation from the Honors Program. This progress will be demonstrated not only through maintenance of a 3.4 GPA, but also through completion of Honors courses according to the schedule below:

Credits Earned Required Honors Credits Earned
30 6
60 9
90 12
120 18

Note that the credit expectations outlined above are the minimums required to maintain status as a student in the Honors program; earning more credits in the first, second, and third years can reduce the requirement in the senior year.

During the junior and senior years, Honors students are required to take (1) a theme-based interdisciplinary studies course and (2) the culminating independent study research course, which may be centered in their major field of study. In identifying the topic, focus and scope of this independent research, the student is guided by an academic advisor/mentor, chosen by the student in consultation with the Director of the Honors Program.

Grade Point Average Requirements

The following table will be used as a guideline in determining academic standing based on cumulative GPA, but students will generally have at least one semester on probation as an opportunity to raise their GPAs before being academically dismissed.

Credits Good Standing Probation Dismissal
0-30 GPA>=3.40 3.40>GPA>=3.00 GPA<3.00
31-60 GPA>=3.40 3.40>GPA>=3.10 GPA<3.10
61+ GPA>=3.40 3.40>GPA>=3.20 GPA<3.20

Along with satisfactory academic progress, there is a required GPA minimum of 3.40 to remain in the Honors Program. If a student’s GPA falls below 3.40 at the end of a given semester, that student may be placed on Honors Probation, or may be dismissed from the Honors Program. A minimum grade requirement of “B” or better is required in a designated Honors course in order for the course to be recorded as an Honors course and for the Honor student to receive Honors credit.  Should a student not receive a grade of “B” or better in a designated Honors course but stil pass the course with a “D” or better, the student will not receive Honors credit but will receive liberal arts elective credits for the course.

A student on Honors probation has up to two semesters to bring his or her GPA to a 3.40, with the Assistant VPAA’s approval in consultation with the Faculty Honors Council and the Director of the Honors Program.  A student who falls below the GPA mark for dismissal, as shown in the table, will be dismissed from the program. As a result, it is possible that a student could take 18 credits of Honors course work and still not complete the Honors Program, if that student’s GPA is less than 3.40 by the time of graduation.

Readmission to the program will be up to the discretion of the Assistant VPAA in consultation with the Faculty Honors Council and the Director of the Honors Program. Appeals may be made within the semester of notification of dismissal or probationary status.

The Honors Program’s academic agenda is complemented and reinforced by cultural and social activities. While designed for traditional undergraduate students, the program is open to non-traditional students. The Honors Program provides students with the opportunity to interact with faculty and other Honors students in courses and in social and cultural activities. Other benefits during the student’s college career include early registration, Honors housing, and cultural trips as well as social activities planned throughout the year. Also, Honors program seniors, who have satisfactorily completed the program, are acknowledged at an Honors Program Recognition Event prior to graduation. Successful completion of the Honors Program is indicated on the student’s official academic transcript.

Class Scheduling and Attendance

Attendance Policies

Course attendance requirements are determined by individual instructors. If a student misses classes, he or she must discuss these absences with the respective faculty members. The offices of Health Services, Student Affairs, and Athletics are not authorized to excuse students from classes. If a student knows in advance that he/she will be absent from a class, the instructor should be informed as soon as possible. The Dean of Student Affairs will inform the instructors and the Registrar. Students who miss classes remain responsible for work assignments and material covered in their absence. Students who withdraw from the College must inform the Registrar before departure. Consecutive absences will be reported to the Dean of Student Affairs by the instructor at mid-term and at term end.

Closings (Weather Line)

Should severe weather or other conditions make it necessary for the administration to suspend classes, such notification will usually be made over local radio stations at approximately 6 am. Students can consult the Weather Line (845-569-3500) or the College website, www.msmc.edu/weather, for school closings or delays; students should not call the switchboard or college personnel. Any canceled classes are required to make up any missed class time.

Auditing Courses

On December 16, 1976, the Board of Trustees approved a resolution from the Faculty Senate that provides for senior citizens (anyone 60 years or over) to audit courses free of charge, subject to permission of the instructor, available space and in accordance with college policy on auditing. The present policy on auditing is as follows:

A regularly enrolled student may audit courses with the permission of the instructor or the chair of the division in which the course is offered, the Registrar and/or the student’s advisor. The instructor establishes the conditions under which the student may audit. In no case will a student receive credit for auditing, but the course audited will be counted in determining student load.

Tuition (generally 50% of the course costs) is charged for an audited course with the exception of senior citizens as described above.

Off-Semester Scheduling

January Interim

January Interim enables students to give exclusive attention to one course of study over a two- to three-week period before the spring semester. In order to meet the needs of a wide variety of students, courses of both a traditional and non-traditional nature are offered by the College faculty.

If a student pursues a course or courses abroad in another accredited institution of higher education, that credit is treated as a permission credit. In such a situation, the student pays his/her fee to the accredited institution abroad and that college is required to pay the salary of the instructor. Mount Saint Mary College merely records the course, grade, and credit on the student’s transcript and does not get involved in an exchange of finances. However, if the Mount offers a course abroad and hires an instructor to teach the course, the student pays the Mount a fee for the credits taken and the College pays the instructor for teaching the course.

Participation in January Interim is entirely voluntary. Students may participate in anticipation of early graduation, as an alternative to the normal five-course study program in the spring and fall semesters or to take advantage of the many non-traditional course offerings that are common to the Interim.

A student may register for a maximum of one 3-credit seated class and one 3-credit online class during January Interim. Requests for exceptions to this policy will be forwarded to the Academic Standards Committee.

Summer Session

The college offers two 5-week summer sessions. Students who register for Summer Session courses are generally advised not to carry more than two courses per session.

Registrar Information

The Office of the Registrar is responsible for the following services:

  1. Maintaining the integrity of Mount Saint Mary College academic records by adhering to all college, state, and federal policies and procedures.
  2. Establishing registration procedures and editing all academic calendars and schedule of classes.
  3. Maintaining student authorization for release of education information via the FERPA Release form available in the registrar’s office and on the student portal.
  4. Evaluating and recording of transfer credits on a student’s academic record. The Student Information System will reflect the transfer courses accepted. Advisors have access to this system.
  5. Coordinating the evaluation of nontraditional credit programs.
  6. Processing independent study and internship forms, incomplete request forms, registration forms, add-drop forms, pass-fail registrations, FERPA verification, and all request forms to study outside of the Mount. All forms are available in Office of the Registrar and on the student portal.
  7. Maintaining academic progress reports for each student through the Student Information System. All mid-term and final grades are available via the Student Information System. 
  8. Issuing official student transcripts at a student’s written request. The cost is $5 each. An unofficial copy of a student’s transcript will be provided upon written request at no charge to currently enrolled students. Note: Official and unofficial transcripts will not be released if the Student Accounts Office or other college officials have initiated a “hold” on transcripts.

Add/Drop Policy

The add/drop period allows students the opportunity to alter their schedule without incurring a notation on their transcript or being charged tuition. For traditional courses, this period extends for the first week of the semester. For accelerated courses, this period ends after the first week of the class. See the Academic Calendar for specific add/drop dates.

Students may not attend classes for which they have not officially registered. Students who attend class without the proper authorization from the Registrar will not receive a grade or credit for the class. A student can add courses to their schedule via the campus web module, or by submitting an add slip to the Registrar by the specified deadline.

Not attending a class does not, by itself, constitute an official drop from that course. To officially drop a course, students must use the campus web module or submit a drop slip to the Registrar by the specified deadline. Failure to take the appropriate action will result in a failing grade and a financial penalty.

After the end of the add/drop period, students still have the opportunity to withdraw from a class without incurring an academic penalty. See the withdrawal policy for further details.

Withdrawal from a Course

Students must submit a withdrawal slip to the Registrar to be dropped from a class and reduce the financial obligation. The date of withdrawal submission to the Registrar will determine any reimbursement. When a student withdraws during the period of the second week of class and three weeks after the mid-semester date, the symbol W will be entered on the individual’s transcript. No credits or quality points will be given for the course work. When a student withdraws after the above period, the grade F will be entered on the individual’s record.

Permission for Credits

The usual course load is 15 credits or five academic credit courses in a traditional semester. Full-time students with a minimum GPA of 3.0 may be permitted to register for more than five academic credit courses. (See course load limitations below.) These limits may not be exceeded without the approval of the Academic Standards Committee. Students should anticipate graduation, major and course requirements and submit appropriate requests in a timely manner. Freshmen in their first semester at Mount Saint Mary College are limited to five credit bearing courses.

Requests for course overloads must be submitted to the chair of the Academic Standards Committee before the start of the semester. All requests must be submitted and approved by the end of the add/drop period.                                                

Course Load Limits        
Student Status   Regular   Maximum Credits Per Fall/Spring Semester With Lab, Practicum, Physical Education
Probation, Monitored or Special Consideration   12 credits   13 credits
Students in Good Standing* With 15 MSMC credits   15 credits   17 credits
3.000-3.499 GPA   18 credits   20 credits
3.500-4.000 GPA   21 credits   23 credits
Seniors with 2.750-2.999 GPA for their final semester (or for any senior also completing student teaching)   18 credits   18 credits

 *Students enrolled in the Adult Degree Completion program may take 18 credits per semester with a maximum of 20 credits with lab, practicum, or internship, providing they are in good academic standing.

Students, while matriculated at the Mount, may transfer credits and grades (of C or better; this does not include C- grades) toward degree requirements for course work taken at other institutions, provided prior permission for such courses has been granted by chair of the division offering the courses. In the case of juniors and seniors, course work should be taken at an institution granting the baccalaureate degree.

Students, while matriculated at the Mount , may transfer credits and grades (of C or better; this does not include C- grades) properly evaluated by New York State College Proficiency Examinations or the College Level Examination Program (CLEP). Mount Saint Mary College participates in the Visiting Student Program of the Association of Colleges and Universities in the State of New York.

Reports and Transcripts

Students’ grades are available mid-term (traditional students) and at the end of the semester via the campus web module. Students may request a copy of their academic transcript by filling out a Transcript Request Form, or by submitting a written request to the Office of the Registrar. Fees: Official Transcript: $5; Student Copy: $3 (no charge for currently enrolled students); five copies to same address: $20; 10 copies to same address: $30. You can also access the link to the National Student Clearinghouse at http://www.getmytranscript.com

TRANSCRIPT NOTATIONS

For students who, after a formal conduct procedure, have been found responsible for a crime of violence (including forcible and nonforcible sex offenses, robbery, aggravated assault, criminal homicide, burglary, motor vehicle theft, and arson), the College will make a notation on the transcript of such students that they were “Suspended After a Finding of Responsibility for a Code of Conduct Violation” or “Expelled After a Finding of Responsibility for a Code of Conduct Violation.”  For respondents who withdraw from the College while such conduct charges are pending, and decline to complete the disciplinary process, the College will make a notation on the transcript of such students that they “Withdrew with Conduct Charges Pending.” 

Students may seek the removal of a transcript notation for a suspension in accordance with the procedures outlined in Article III, The Student Conduct Hearing of the Student Code of Conduct, located in Section IX of the Student Handbook, except that such notation shall not be removed prior to one year after conclusion of the suspension.  Notations for expulsion shall not be removed.

If a finding of responsibility is vacated for any reason, any such transcript notation shall be removed.

Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act

Among the Education Amendments Act of 1974 was one amendment sponsored by Senator James Buckley of New York entitled the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), which became effective in November 1974.

In summary, the Buckley Amendment governs access to, and release of, records maintained by certain educational institutions and agencies. Educational records may not be released to third parties (with some exceptions) without the student’s prior, written permission. Eligible Mount Saint Mary College students who have been in attendance have access to their educational records.

Educational records are defined broadly to include records, files, documents and other materials that contain information directly related to a student and are maintained by this college or by a person acting for this college.

The following educational records are maintained by the Registrar as indicated:

  • Academic Probation and Dismissal Letters
  • Acceptance Letters
  • Admissions Application
  • Advanced Placement Reports
  • Appeal and Re-admission Letters\
  • College-level Exams Reports
  • Computer Data Form
  • Grade Changes
  • High School Transcript
  • Incomplete Grade Requests
  • Independent Study Requests
  • Internship Requests
  • Pass/Fail Requests for Grades
  • Permission Forms for Study Outside Mount Saint Mary College
  • Proficiency Examination Results
  • Secondary School Reports
  • Student Transcript
  • Student Directories
  • Transfer Evaluations and Supporting Transcripts
  • Veterans’ Administration Forms
  • Withdrawal Forms

The Office of Student Affairs maintains medical records and disciplinary records.

The Career Center maintains student and alumni placement files.

Upon request, a student may obtain an unofficial transcript of courses. No official transcript is issued to proper authority without the expressed, written consent of the student. A student’s academic advisor may request an evaluation of transfer credits for advisory purposes.

Reports of proficiency examinations, advanced placement tests, and college level examinations are also evaluated by the division chair.

Access to Records

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords students certain rights with respect to their educational records. They are:

  1. The right to inspect and review the student’s education records within 45 days of the day the College receives a request for access. Students should submit to the Office of the Registrar, Associate VPAA, or chair of the academic department, or other appropriate official, written requests that identify the record(s) they wish to inspect. The College official will make arrangements for access and notify the student of the time and place where the records may be inspected. If the records are not maintained by the College official to whom the request was submitted, that official shall advise the student of the correct official to whom the request should be addressed.
  2. The right to request the amendment of the student’s education records that the student believes is inaccurate or misleading. Students may ask the College to amend a record that they believe is inaccurate or misleading. They should write the College official responsible for the record, clearly identify the part of the record they want changed, and specify why it is inaccurate or misleading. If the College decides not to amend the record as requested by the student, the College will notify the student of the decision and advise the student of his/her right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the student when notified of the right to a hearing.
  3. The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the student’s education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. One exception that permits disclosure without consent is disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person employed by the College in an administrative, supervisory, academic or research, or support staff position (including law enforcement unit personnel and health staff); a person or company with whom the College has contracted (such as an attorney, auditor or collection agent); a person serving on the Board of Trustees; or a student serving on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee, or assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility.
  4. The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by the College to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the office that administers FERPA is: Family Policy Compliance Office, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Ave., SW, Washington, D.C. 20202-4605.
  5. The right of access shall include:
    1. List of records kept by the College that are directly related to the student;
    2. Right of inspection and review;
    3. Right to obtain copies but at the individual’s own expense (cost of reproduction: $3 for unofficial transcript, $5 per official transcript, 10 cents per page for other educational records);
    4. Right to reasonable explanation of records;
    5. Right to hearing to challenge the content of records.

 Eligible students do not have a right of access in the following cases:

  1. Financial records of parents;
  2. Confidential materials or recommendations submitted before January 1, 1975;
  3. Where there has been a waiver concerning confidential recommendations - admissions, employment, and honor awards.

Challenges to the Contents of Records

Eligible students shall have the right to a hearing to ensure that records are not inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise violate privacy. The opportunity to correct or delete information where appropriate shall be provided. In addition, an opportunity to submit a written explanation when deemed necessary by the challenger is provided.

Student/Alumni Directory Information

Student Directory Information is standard information that the College may release for public consumption without prior authorization. It includes: student’s name, address, telephone listing, college email address, date and place of birth, major field of study, participation in officially recognized activities and sports, weight and height of members of athletic teams, photographs, dates of attendance, degrees and awards received and the most recent previous educational agency or institution attended by the student.

Mount students may request that directory information not be released without their written consent by contacting the Office of the Registrar. Mount graduates may likewise request a ban of release of directory information in the Alumni Directory before publication by sending a written request to the Office of Alumni Affairs.

Study Abroad Program

Mount Saint Mary College affords students the opportunity to pursue academic year, semester, summer or January Interim programs abroad. The study abroad initiative is in accord with the Mount’s response to the growing need for students to gain cultural competency and study within a global classroom. Our purpose is to enhance the college experience of our students by providing opportunities in academic achievement, global competence, and personal growth through quality international education.  For semester or year-long study students must be sophomores standing or above, with a minimum GPA of 2.5. January interim and summer programs are open to all students who have successfully completed 12 undergraduate credits with an overall GPA of a 2.5 or a 3.0 in their major.

Academic Year/Semester Study Abroad

In order to give students experiences provided by other member institutions in the consortium, the Mount also maintains formal affiliation agreements with thrid party providers of study abroad opportunities such as EF (Education First), CAPA the Global Education Network, ISA (International Studies Abroad), CEA (Cultural Experiences Abroad) and CIS (Center for International Studies).  All federal monies are portable for Mount students studying abroad for a fall and/or spring term. Institutional aid is also available though not guaranteed.  We also offer students the opportunity to intern abroad in fourteen different countries during the summer months through our partnership with CIS Abroad.

Mount students have recently studied abroad in Italy; Australia; South Africa; Peru, the Czech Republic and more.  Mount students have also participated in the Semester at Sea Program sponsored by The University of Virginia and have volunteered all over the world.

Note: The student must achieve the equivalent of a C- grade or better in a course taken abroad from either a foreign institution or from another American college or university sponsoring the study abroad for the course credit to transfer to the Mount.  All academic coursework is approved prior to travel to assure that appropriate degree progress is being met.  Students on probation or under disciplinary action must be off probation for one full semester prior to travel.

The Mount’s Short-Term Study Abroad Programs

The Mount sponsors its own short-term summer, spring break and interim study abroad programs. While these Mount-based programs are primarily directed toward its own student body, students from other colleges and universities are welcome to participate. In the event of unprecedented demand for a limited number of program participant vacancies, preference is given first to Mount students with a minimum 2.5 Grade Point Average; secondly, to students from member institutions in the Lower Hudson Valley Catholic Colleges Consortium; and, thirdly, to students from other colleges and universities.

Mount students must have a minimum 2.5 overall GPA or a 3.0 within their major field to participate in Mount study abroad programs. All students must be recommended by two full-time Mount faculty members or by an administrator to be accepted into the program. A satisfactory interview with the Director of International Programs may also be required.

Regular short-term programs include the following and unless noted are run concurrently with the Summer 1 class session (please note that programs may change annually; plan ahead for your study abroad experience):

 

The Mount in Dominican Republic 2017 (every spring break)

The Spring Break Dominican Republic Program is open to the following majors:  Nursing, Human Services, and Hispanic Studies.  Undergraduates can earn 3 credits during their spring semester.  This course will provide an intensive introduction into the health care system and the role of the nurse in health promotion.  Students will work in conjunction with the Foundation for Peace while caring for people in the Bateyes in the Dominican Republic.

The Mount in Florence, Italy 2017 (every summer)

This program allows students to study within the heart of Italy, walking distance from the art and architecture that has defined European culture. Students take two courses (3 credits each course) taught by Mount Saint Mary College professors in areas such as Italian Art History, Psychology, Math and Science.  Excursions are included and students live in standard Italian apartments walking distance from the campus.  All classes take place at the CAPA center within the shadow of The Duomo.

The Mount in London, England 2017 (every other summer)

This program allows students to study at London’s only residential garden campus, with the center of London just a few steps away. Students take two courses worth 3 credits taught by Mount Saint Mary College professors in areas such as History, Art, Religion, English, and Theater. Students can experience life as it was when Shakespeare first produced his masterpieces at the Globe Theater, take a ride on the London Eye, or stroll through the Harry Potter Experience.

The Mount in Spain:  Travel and Learn 2017 (every other summer)

This program is designed to give students a true Spanish experience. From Madrid to Barcelona, students will travel to four different Spanish cities all in one month. Each location offers an amazing opportunity to explore the diverse populations and wonders of Spain. Students take two courses worth 3 credits taught by Mount Saint Mary College professors in areas such as History, Spanish language, Philosophy, Nursing, and Economics. Student can engage in cultural activities and excursions to expose the rich history and culture of Spain.    

The Mount in Shanhai, China - January Interim 2016 - 2017 (every other winter)

Shanghai is the perfect choice for students wanting to witness the making of China’s future. It’s a bustling metropolis with a must have mentality towards anything Western, hip, and ultra-modern. The program takes place late December to mid-January. Students earn 3 credits during their winter break along with local and overnight excursions to Chinese sights of interest taught by Mount Saint Mary College professors in areas such as Business, History, Sociology, and Science. Past trips included Taji in the park, Beijing, and Xi’an.

MSMC SHORT TERM STUDY ABROAD 2018

The Mount in Dominican Republic 2018 (every spring break)

The Spring Break Dominican Republic Program is open to the following majors:  Nursing, Human Services, and Hispanic Studies.  Undergraduates can earn 3 credits during their spring semester.  This course will provide an intensive introduction into the health care system and the role of the nurse in health promotion.  Students will work in conjunction with the Foundation for Peace while caring for people in the Bateyes in the Dominican Republic.

The Mount in Dublin, Ireland 2018 (every other summer)  

Students choose two courses that best fit their academic needs for 6 credits. As a complement to classrooms studies, students participate in visits to local companies and places of interest related to the program. All classes and lectures are held at Griffith College in the center of Dublin, making for a truly immersive Irish experience in a global city.

The Mount in Florence, Italy 2018 (every summer)

This program allows students to study within the heart of Italy, walking distance from the art and architecture that has defined European culture. Students take two courses (3 credits each course) taught by Mount Saint Mary College professors in areas such as Italian Art History, Psychology, Math and Science.  Excursions are included and students live in standard Italian apartments walking distance from the campus.  All classes take place at the CAPA center within the shadow of The Duomo.

The Mount in Paris, France 2018 (every other summer)

The summer program in France is focused on French culture and experience. Students can study intensively while using the unique context of France, its business, museums, monuments, and communities to bring to life the materials learned in class. Students will choose two courses that best fit their academic needs for a total of 6 credits. As a complement to classrooms studies, students will also have the opportunity to participate in visits to local companies and places of interest related to the program.

The Mount in New Zealand - January Interim 2017-2018  (every other winter)

This course is designed to introduce students to the cultural and biological diversity of New Zealand. The program takes place late December to mid-January. Students earn 3 Biology credits taught by Mount Saint Mary College professor. This multi-week trip will include visits to reintroduction/colony sites of many endangered species, the major cities of New Zealand, and strongholds of the first settlers of New Zealand.

 

In summary, Mount students have a wide range of study abroad options. With the permission of the Mount’s academic divisions, the Director of International Programs can make arrangements with other institutions to facilitate and expand venues for Mount student participation in study abroad. Advisors in the student’s major participate in the course approval process to assure that courses taken abroad complement and are integrated into a student’s total academic program at the Mount, and that credits awarded count towards the completion of the 120 credits required for graduation.  Learn more about the MSMC study abroad options through our website at http://www.msmc.edu/Academics/Study_Abroad. 

INTERNATIONAL INTERNSHIPS (summers only)

Interning abroad will encourage personal development while laying the foundation as an engaged world citizen ready to succeed in the new global economy. Internships combine practical work experiences with academic majors and career goals. International internships provide you with a well-rounded education that will help you to:

  • Broaden academic perspectives
  • Increase global awareness
  • Build cultural competency

Our internships combine practical work experience with academic majors and career goals. Previous international internships included sites in Ireland, Spain, London, and China.  In summary, nothing can add to the professional dimension and powerful credentials to a student’s education better than an internship experience.

For more information on how to study abroad with Mount Saint Mary College, contact the Office of International Programs at (845) 569-3798 or email study.abroad@msmc.edu.   

Career Center

The Career Center offers students and alumni information and services to assist them in their career preparation.

Career Development provides individual counseling regarding career planning, interest assessment, resume/cover letter critiques, graduate school guidance, and job search assistance. Workshops and seminars are also conducted on various topics that include career decision making, applying to graduate school, resume and cover letter writing, interviewing skills, and job search strategies. In a comprehensive survey concerning the status of a recent graduating class, results indicated that 91% were employed six months after graduation, with 86% employed in positions related to their field, and 35% were pursuing graduate, professional or other study beyond the bachelor’s degree.

Co-ops, internships, volunteer and shadow opportunities are optional educational experiences that promote academic, personal, and professional development. This enrichment opportunity adds a professional dimension to the traditional college curriculum by enabling students to combine practical work experiences with academic majors and career goals.  Students who are pursuing programs of study in psychology, physical therapy/psychology, human services, technology and digital media, and sports management are required to participate in this program to obtain their prescribed internship.

Many businesses, schools, health-care facilities, social service agencies, scientific laboratories, information systems companies, public relations and media companies employ students in career-related work experiences that reinforce knowledge learned in the classroom and prepare students with life skills and career choices.

Students may work in paid co-op positions or in internships related to their majors. During the internship experience, students earn academic credit that satisfies degree requirements. Occasionally, students may earn academic credit for the learning that occurs during a paid co-op experience. Faculty must approve the co-op or internship job description as worthy of academic credit before a student may register for credit.

Students are required to complete a minimum of 45 hours of work to earn one academic credit.  Grading will be either Pass or Fail.  Credit will not be awarded for work completed before registration for an internship.

The Career Center staff will also assist students in obtaining appropriate volunteer and shadow experiences that are necessary to satisfy application requirements for graduate professional schools.

Participation in co-ops, internships, volunteer and shadow experiences affords students in all academic disciplines the opportunity to:

  • gain practical career-related experience before graduation;
  • enhance job search skills including resume writing and interview strategies;
  • develop professional work habits, interpersonal skills and confidence;
  • apply skills learned in the classroom;
  • explore potential career interests;
  • develop employer and networking contacts;
  • earn college credit for internships and selected co-op experiences;
  • defray educational costs.

Students acquire practical experience in their major field by working part time (15-20 hours per week) or full time during a semester, or part time or full time during the summer.

Matriculated students in any major who have completed the freshman year and earned 30 credits, are registered for at least 6 credits per semester and have a minimum GPA of 2.5 (2.0 for psychology, physical therapy/psychology, human services, technology and digital media, and sports management) are eligible to participate in co-ops, internships, volunteer and shadow experiences. Students must be in good academic and social standing. Those on academic probation, monitored program and those who are under any imposed sanctions as described in the Student Judicial Code, including residence hall probation and disciplinary probation, are not eligible to participate.

Students interested in these experiential education opportunities must work together with the Career Center staff coordinators to complete the application process and/or update their portfolios during the semester preceding the work experience. With assistance from their academic advisors, students who carefully plan their course schedules can accommodate both class and work schedules.

Mount students and alumni may access our database, Connections, to search for part-time and full-time jobs, co-ops, internships, volunteer and shadow experiences.  The Career Center staff coordinators will assist students as they apply for positions.

Staff coordinators develop and maintain contacts and referrals and facilitate the introduction of students to cooperating employers. The final responsibility for interviewing, evaluating, selecting, and hiring students, however, rests with the employer. The student, under the direction and supervision of the employer during each work period, then becomes the employee of the cooperating employer. Therefore, Mount Saint Mary College will not guarantee that students will be selected by employers/organizations for positions or assume liability for any action or omission by a student or employer during a co-op, internship, volunteer or shadow experience.

 

Office of Graduate and Adult Degree Completion Programs

The Office of Graduate and Adult Degree Completion Programs welcomes and assists all just starting or resuming academic studies in our evening/weekend format to acquire new work-related competencies or pursue interests that enrich their lives. The Mount offers seven bachelor’s degree programs and three master’s degree programs in business, education, and nursing. More information can be obtained by visiting the Mount’s website at www.msmc.edu, or by visiting the campus and speaking to one of our representatives.

Students matriculated in the College’s accelerated or traditional undergraduate and graduate programs may avail themselves of the Mount’s Career Center and other campus services.

Contact the Office of Admissions for Graduate and Adult Degree Completion Programs at 845-569-3223, or send an email to adultstudentadmissions@msmc.edu for more information or to speak with an advisor. Candidates for the master’s degree may program may send an inquiry to graduateadmissions@msmc.edu

Adult Degree Completion Programs

Adult Degree Completion programs provide busy adult students the chance to earn a bachelor’s degree in two and a half years. For pre-licensure nursing majors, the program takes three and a half years. Students may pursue a degree at a chosen pace, and may elect to “stop out” for a period as family or work demands dictate.

The ADC program offers in-classroom, hybrid, and fully online courses to provide greater flexibility for the non-traditional student. It offers several programs of study: accounting, business, human services, interdiscipinary degree toward education, nursing, online RN to BS in nursing, and psychology. By participating fully in this flexible program, a student may earn up to 48 credits per year.

The academic year is divided into shorter sessions, with courses offered Monday/Wednesday, Tuesday/Thursday evenings, or Saturdays. Hybrid courses and online learning are being incorporated into academic offerings to maximize student convenience and flexibility. The combination of hybrid courses and online learning with the Mount’s personalized advisement and adaptable scheduling allows more adults to obtain a bachelor’s degree in the shortest time period. Through individualized counseling, students are encouraged to establish a realistic educational plan that suits their long-term goals while fulfilling their family and job responsibilities.

Adult Students in the Traditional Undergraduate Program

Adult students may choose the traditional undergraduate program that offers a wider choice of majors and courses, and the opportunity to pursue New York State Teacher Certification as part of their undergraduate degree.

Traditional Students in Adult Degree Completion courses

Students enrolled in the traditional program who have earned fewer than 60 credits are not allowed to enroll in 8-week accelerated courses that overlap with the traditional fall or spring semesters. Traditional students with 60 or more earned credits and a GPA of 2.75 may enroll in one 8-week accelerated course during the traditional fall or spring semester after they have completed one semester of full-time (12 credits) coursework in the traditional day program, with the permission of their advisor and the chair of the division offering the course. Students may seek exceptions to these policies from the vice president for academic affairs, with the approval of their advisor and the chair of the division offering the accelerated course as well as the Director of ADCP..

Desmond Campus for Adult Enrichment

The Desmond Campus for Adult Enrichment in Balmville (2 miles north of the main campus) provides noncredit courses and educational programs for adults of all ages to expand their skills, knowledge, and understanding, from art to computer skills to yoga. LIFE (Learning Is Forever Enriching) is an educational and social program for adult learners, aged 55 and older. Courses are taught during daytime hours by volunteer instructors. Full-length courses, short courses, and day trips are offered through the program. There are three sessions per year: March-June; July-October; and November-February, with separate catalogs for each. A minimal membership fee applies for each session.

Since 1997, the Desmond staff have organized the Mount’s participation in the Road Scholars program, which is held every year during the summer. Each one-week session includes classroom instruction and related field trips. The program is offered to those 55 years old and over on a resident or commuter basis. For more information about any of these programs, call the Desmond Campus for Adult Enrichment at 845-565-2076, or send an email to desmondcampus@msmc.edu.

Life experience plus credit by examination may not exceed 45 credits.

Prior Learning Assessment

Prior Learning Assessment (PLA) is the evaluation of any learning that did not take place in a traditional college classroom or that was garnered outside of traditional college courses.  This can include, but is not limited to, on the job training, community service, voluntary service, independent study or hobbies, professional development courses, and training at conference seminars or workshops.  Students demonstrate the college level learning they have acquired through any of these methods, or a combination of one or more, and are assessed through a portfolio of prior learning experience.

In addition, reflecting on prior learning experience and relating it to college level learning is a valuable exercise unto itself; it provides the student with the opportunity to analyze what they have learned.  PLA goes hand in hand with the non-tradtional format of the Adult Degree Completion Program.  The student can identify potential learning experiences and use that learning where it would fit best:  to fulfill requirements within their major, or as liberal arts electives. 

Credits are granted by the institution to students who can prove the level of knowledge they have acquired outside of academia over an extended period of time.  In addition, credits are granted not based upon the experience itself, but the level of learning and knowledge obtained through the experience, which is presented through a well-crafted portfolio.

Credit by Examination

The New York State College Proficiency Examination Program (NYSCPEP), the College Level Examination Program (CLEP), Defense Activity for Non-Traditional Education Support (DANTES), other national proficiency examination programs and select teacher-made exams are designed to enable undergraduates to earn college credits. Life experience plus credit by examination may not exceed 45 credits.

Mount Saint Mary College requires that:

  1. The CLEP General Examinations and subject examinations selected must be consistent with the College’s general curriculum.  Students should see their advisors or the Office of the Registrar for additional information. Students are responsible for any costs associated with these examinations.
  2. Applicant’s credits will be evaluated as transfer credits from other institutions.
  3. No more than 45 credits may be awarded for credit by examination, only nine of which may be in a student’s major area, excepting registered nurses seeking advanced placement and military LPN’s enrolled through the AMEDD program. Registered nurses matriculating in the nursing program may earn up to 24 credits in nursing by examination.
  4. Examinations equivalent to lower level division work at Mount Saint Mary College will be counted with the transfer credits of two-year institutions. Generally, a maximum of 60 credits is allowed; however, students completing an associate’s degree will be allowed to transfer the number of credits (maximum of 66 credits for courses with C or better grades) required to attain that degree at the two-year institution. If the examinations are equivalent to upper level division work, the credits will be counted in the 90-credit authorization of four-year institutions.

Credits granted by examination will be indicated on the student’s transcript and will not be granted in a subject area below the level of work for which course credit has been previously awarded. When a student is awarded credit by examination after matriculation at Mount Saint Mary College, the grade received will be indicated on the student’s transcript and will be included in the cumulative index.

Mount Saint Mary College Challenge Examinations provide a way for students to meet certain requirements of the College:

  1. A Challenge Examination may be taken for waiver of a course without getting credit for a course (for example, to satisfy a prerequisite). The examination may be taken to receive full credit for the course. The fees associated with these examinations may be found under Tuition and Fees in this catalog.
  2. Teacher-designed Challenge Examinations may be given for any course that contributes to the major at the discretion of the division for that major. Divisions are not required to provide Challenge Examinations but may do so for all, some or none of their courses, as appropriate to their requirements and Academic Standards.
  3. Teacher-designed Challenge Examinations for general education courses are approved only for those courses for which there does not already exist a nationally recognized assessment examination such as CLEP.
  4. Teacher-designed tests are not subject to limitations on transfer credits (for example, a student who has already transferred 60 credits may still gain credit by a Challenge Examination). No more than 6 credits can be granted by Mount Saint Mary College Credit Examinations. These credits do not count toward the 30-credit residency requirement for a degree from the College. There is no limit on the number of courses a student may waive via Challenge Examinations.
  5. Challenge examinations can be taken just one time for any given course.
  6. A grade corresponding to a C is the minimum requirement to pass a Challenge Examination. However, only the Pass grade will be awarded.
  7. Students should be aware that other institutions may not accept credits earned by Challenge Examinations for transfer.

Office of Online Education

Mount Saint Mary College promotes the application of online learning technologies in hundreds of courses offered to undergraduate and graduate students every year, from enhancing traditional classroom instruction to enabling the delivery of teaching online in lieu of on-campus class meetings. The College views online learning as an extremely valuable format to supplement classroom learning and to strengthen learner engagement and collaboration in all Mount academic programs. For graduate and adult undergraduate programs, online learning also provides the opportunity to increase access for student populations that otherwise would not be able to participate in and benefit from the College’s higher education programs due to constraints of family, work, distance, and so forth.

A variety of technologies are being used for online learning, including our advanced learning management system and synchronous learning delivery platform that facilitate and encourage collaborative learning and interactions among the faculty and students in their respective courses. Faculty members are also eager to explore and integrate emerging technology applications into their courses, such as blogs, wikis, and other Web 2.0 tools.

Mount Saint Mary College offers fully online and hybrid courses for undergraduates. Call the Office of Admissions for Graduate and Adult Degree Completion at 845-569-3223 for more information.

For general information, or to learn more about online learning, email the Office of Online Education at onlinelearning@msmc.edu or call 845-569-3457.